Shiny object syndrome
Digital inspiration tears, for real-time creative endeavors

Pinterest.com/samccandless
Shiny object syndrome
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"It’s not ‘clever lonely’ (like Morrissey) or ‘interesting lonely’ (like Radiohead); it’s ‘lonely lonely,’ like the way it feels when you’re being hugged by someone and it somehow makes you sadder."
Klosterman, Chuck. Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs: A Low Culture Manifesto.  (via wordsnquotes)
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vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
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"The Air signs can seem a little lazy - letting their houses fill with clutter, procrastinating, staring out the window… and yet just because they are not physically moving does not mean they are not traveling or wandering.. their minds are libraries of words with tangents of sideways, backwards forward thinking ideas. Air signs are always mentally alert, active and illuminated - its our society’s disrespect for thought, the idea that staring off into space and thinking is ‘doing nothing’; when it is the sensual exercising of their own intellect they are playing with, the fertile breeding ground for all reality, because everything real was once imagined into existence - by a thinker"
Aquarius, Libra, Gemini

C x (via astrolocherry)
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mentalalchemy:

Moons
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byronesque:

© Bryan Adams
jonathandredge:

Tilda Swinton by Bryan Adams
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"I’ve learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he/she handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights. I’ve learned that regardless of your relationship with your parents, you’ll miss them when they’re gone from your life. I’ve learned that making a “living” is not the same thing as making a “life.” I’ve learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance. I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands; you need to be able to throw something back. I’ve learned that whenever I decide something with an open heart, I usually make the right decision. I’ve learned that even when I have pains, I don’t have to be one. I’ve learned that every day you should reach out and touch someone. People love a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back. I’ve learned that I still have a lot to learn. I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel."
Maya Angelou (via graaceisgone)
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"I once had to say this on a show many years ago, and I truly believe it: Loneliness is a choice. I like to be alone; I’m more comfortable alone. But I do recognise that I take it too far sometimes and so I try to force myself to keep up with being sociable. I just am a bit of a lone ranger; I always have been. But I don’t believe that necessarily has to translate to being lonely. You can be lonely in a crowd of a thousand people. I can be in a hotel room on my own, and not feel lonely. It all comes down to how comfortable you are with who you are in the silence."
Gillian Anderson (via allweare-juststories)
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"Reality doesn’t impress me. I only believe in intoxication, in ecstasy, and when ordinary life shackles me, I escape, one way or another."
Anais Nin
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"Eyes. Those damn eyes fucked me forever."

Star Sign Quotes
Scorpio

Charles Bukowski, The Days Run Away Like Wild Horses

(via astrolocherry)
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"If you cannot find a friend who is good, wise, and loving, walk alone, like a king who has renounced his kingdom, or an elephant roaming at will in the forest."

Buddha (via psychedeliknights)

taurus

(via sweetcheeksaremadeofthese)
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wasbella102:

By David Wright
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artslant:

Tara Kelton ‘Traveling without moving’ at Galleryskehttp://www.artslant.com/ind/events/show/330070-traveling-without-moving