Shiny object syndrome
Digital inspiration tears, for real-time creative endeavors

Pinterest.com/samccandless
Shiny object syndrome
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brutalgeneration:

A Cruiser by Olli Kekäläinen on Flickr.
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"I am constantly torn between wanting to improve myself and wanting to destroy myself."
Unknown (via thatkindofwoman)
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"Give up short term pleasure for long term rewards."
(via cartoonstyles)
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youreinahaze:

be-healfit:

France is not just Paris.

i am obsessed with mont saint michel
like how?
youreinahaze:

be-healfit:

France is not just Paris.

i am obsessed with mont saint michel
like how?
youreinahaze:

be-healfit:

France is not just Paris.

i am obsessed with mont saint michel
like how?
youreinahaze:

be-healfit:

France is not just Paris.

i am obsessed with mont saint michel
like how?
youreinahaze:

be-healfit:

France is not just Paris.

i am obsessed with mont saint michel
like how?
youreinahaze:

be-healfit:

France is not just Paris.

i am obsessed with mont saint michel
like how?
youreinahaze:

be-healfit:

France is not just Paris.

i am obsessed with mont saint michel
like how?
youreinahaze:

be-healfit:

France is not just Paris.

i am obsessed with mont saint michel
like how?
youreinahaze:

be-healfit:

France is not just Paris.

i am obsessed with mont saint michel
like how?
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Getting used to happiness
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10magazine:

TGIF PLAYLIST #8 
Here we have a selection of songs from our very own Editor-in-Chief Sophia Neophitou’s son Zac. Master Zac is younger than us. And this is what people younger than us are listening too at the moment, he’ll have you know. Enjoy feeling down with the kids. 
Listen to the playlist by clicking here.
By Will Johns
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whitenoten:

 
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"The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane."
Marcus Aurelius, Meditations  (via thatkindofwoman)
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"It’s not ‘clever lonely’ (like Morrissey) or ‘interesting lonely’ (like Radiohead); it’s ‘lonely lonely,’ like the way it feels when you’re being hugged by someone and it somehow makes you sadder."
Klosterman, Chuck. Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs: A Low Culture Manifesto.  (via wordsnquotes)
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vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
vacilandoelmundo:

I’m no linguist, but I find things to do with cross-cultural communication to be fascinating. Hence, the Business Insider title, ”These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World,” piqued my interest in the article. 
Business Insider’s Gus Lubin took the communication diagrams from a book called “When Cultures Collide” by British linguist Richard D. Lewis. In the book, Lewis maps communication patterns, leadership styles, and cultural identities. On the benefits of cross-cultural understanding, he writes:

A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.

For us non-linguists, Lubin gives a brief summary of each diagram, which you can read in the caption of each diagram. 
For diagrams of Canadian, French, Hong Kong, Israeli, Indian, Swiss, Singaporean, Korean, Indonesian, Hungarian, Finnish, Bulgarian, Norwegian, Danish, Turkish, Polish, Swedish and Dutch communication patterns, check out the article here. 
What’s your take? Do you think that different nationalities have different communication patterns? Does Lewis accurately capture your nationality’s communication pattern?
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"The Air signs can seem a little lazy - letting their houses fill with clutter, procrastinating, staring out the window… and yet just because they are not physically moving does not mean they are not traveling or wandering.. their minds are libraries of words with tangents of sideways, backwards forward thinking ideas. Air signs are always mentally alert, active and illuminated - its our society’s disrespect for thought, the idea that staring off into space and thinking is ‘doing nothing’; when it is the sensual exercising of their own intellect they are playing with, the fertile breeding ground for all reality, because everything real was once imagined into existence - by a thinker"
Aquarius, Libra, Gemini

C x (via astrolocherry)